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Award recognises ground-breaking Liverpool work to help women with the Angelina Jolie gene

The so called "Angelina Jolie gene" is why the Hollywood actress had risk reducing surgery for her breasts, ovaries and fallopian tubes to reduce her risk of cancer. Women tend to be offered testing f...


NWC GMC behind 'genomic dream' to make DNA tests routine for patients

The North West Coast Genomic Medicine Centre (NWC GMC) was set up to gain a better understanding of the genetic causes of cancer and rare diseases and is in full support of making DNA tests routine fo...



An Introduction to Fetal Genomics

Who should attend: This event is aimed at Paediatricians, Neonatologists, Obstetricians, FetalMedicine Specialists & Midwives, Genetic Counsellors, Geneticists & Trainee Community Midwives, a...


Meanings, Mainstreaming & MDT's? 100,000 Genomes Results; Top tips for cancer clinicians

Who should attend: This event is for North West Coast NHS staff only, particularly thoseworking with cancer patients and involved in the 100,000 Genomes Project. The event will cover: 100K Genome...


Oncology & Immunotherapy Study Day

Who should attend: This event is aimed at members of the Cancer MDT specifically consultants,senior nurses, trainees & AHPs. Aims: To understand immunotherapy in cancer and its current knowle...



Taking Part

Taking part in the 100,000 Genome Project

Participants will be eligible to take part in the 100,000 Genome Project if they have at least one of the listed conditions, which can be viewed here. People who meet this criteria may be contacted by our recruitment nurses to discuss if they would be interested in finding out more about the project. Contact us to register your interest here.

Individuals with a family history of one or more of these conditions listed may also wish to contact their GP or clinician to ask if they may also be eligible to participate in the project.

If people are interested in the project, the recruitment nurse will make an appointment for them to speak to one of our clinicians.  Contact us to register your interest here. At this point they will be able to discuss any concerns or questions that they may have and will be given the choice to participate in the project.  The potential participant will be given as much time as they require to consider whether or not to be involved.

If they do choose to be a participant, a further appointment will be made for them to attend the relevant clinic for their condition. At this appointment they will be asked to sign a formal consent form to confirm that they are happy to take part in the project. A blood sample will then be taken from them, this will be sent to a central laboratory to be ‘sequenced’ (genetically analysed). They will also have the option to decide if we only analyse their blood  sample against the condition they have, or whether they would like a complete profiling (a full check-up) to see if they have a higher risk of developing any other potential underlying conditions.

The results of this analysis will be sent back to our own laboratories to be checked and validated by our clinicians. A report will then be produced, based on the findings of this sequencing. A meeting will be arranged to discuss the results of this report will with them.

We hope in the future that this project will find more information about the individual conditions including its cause and help in the development of treatments better suited to their own individual needs.

If participants have opted to be fully profiled, the report might include other findings which we may need to discuss with them.

If you would like to take part, contact us to register your interest here